Join us in SF at Supermarket Street Sweep 8 on Dec. 7th 2013!

Supermarket Street Sweep 8 is coming, and TEAM YUBA will once again be there!  

SMSW8 by jkoshi, on Flickr

Join us on Dec. 7th as we once again participate in a fun event for a worthy cause.

WHAT: The Supermarket Street Sweep is an annual bike race that benefits the San Francisco and Marin Food Banks! For the past 7 years, hundreds of participants have zipped around the city to local supermarkets and brought back thousands of pounds of food to donate to this wonderful charity.

WHEN: Saturday, December 7, 2013. High Noon.

WHERE: Cupid’s Span (Bow & Arrow) at Folsom and Embarcadero.

The Yuba Team has so much fun at this event, collecting food, raising money and awareness for a worthy cause, while hanging out with other Cargo Bicycle riders and showing “What a Bicycle Can Do!”

We’d love to see YOU, our Bay Area family at the event.  Let us know if you plan to be there!

Carry Kids by Bike with the NEW Monkey Bars for the Yuba Mundo!

Are you looking for a way to carry kids by bike?  Many of our riders use the Yuba Mundo to transport kids to and from school and other outings.  The Monkey Bars have been designed with these families in mind, offering a bit more structure for the passengers, and peace of mind for the rider.

A Child Bike Seat Alternative: Monkey Bars for the Yuba Mundo make it safe and fun to carry kids by bike!

Child Bike Seat Alternative: Yuba Mundo with Monkey Bars make it safe and fun to carry kids by bike!

The Monkey Bars will accommodate multiple children with or without the Peanut Shell baby seat.  Have a look at the video below, and learn more about the Monkey Bars here.

‘A Bike That Will Replace Your Family Car.’ GearJunkie Tests Out The Yuba Mundo Cargo Bike

“I tested the Mundo model from Yuba this summer and early fall. It is a capable hauler, and with big pannier bags hooked onto the frame a rider can roll home with a full grocery cart of food.

“For kids, the bike is an excellent alternative to a car on short trips. My young boys, aged 4 and 6, jump onto the Yuba with smiles. They howl for more as we rocket down hills.”

See the entire review here.

The GearJunkie Test Riders give smiles of approval!

“Forget the MiniVan” says Outside Magazine. Family Life with the Yuba el Mundo.

Wondering what it is like to trade in the car for an Electric Cargo Bike? Michael Roberts shares his experience with his family on an el Mundo at Outside Magazine Online.

Outside Minivan

Ready to ditch the MiniVan!? Get your el Mundo here.

Sarrazin Takes the Tahoe SUP Cup!

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Yuba Bicycle’s founder on his way to the podium

Yuba Bicycles founder Benjamin Sarrazin is not just a cargo biking pioneer: he’s also a champion paddleboarder. Sarrazin recently won the O’Neill Tahoe Cup, a three-race standup paddleboard series held on Lake Tahoe. He took first place in the Tahoe Cup’s elite men’s category following his second-place finish in the 22-mile race across the lake on Sept. 15.

Sarrazin, who can frequently be seen riding in Petaluma with his Boda Boda and Mundo with a Boga brand paddleboard strapped to the side loaders, took up paddleboarding around the time he launched Yuba in 2006. He spent his teens and 20s racing kayaks, so he was no stranger to paddling when he took up this new sport.

Earlier in the summer, Sarrazin took second place in the Jam from the Dam, and third in the Donner Lake Memorial race. His two seconds and one third-place finish were good enough to take the overall series victory–and a nice cash prize.

“In the last few miles my arms were cramping up bad. Twenty-two miles is a long way. But the adrenaline rush kept me going once I knew that I had beaten my closest competitor,” Sarrazin says.

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Next spring, expect some big news about a new Yuba accessory that will make it even easier to carry your paddleboard or surfboard on a Mundo or Boda Boda. After all, why drive your board to the beach when you can pedal it there? “Using my cargo bikes to get my boards to the water fits with the true spirit of Yuba, which is to design bikes that allow you to get work done and carry big objects that previously required a car.”

 

Yuba Sponsored Entry in USA Pro Challenge makes move in stage 7

Tim Schaefer  US Pro ChallengeHaving held back most of the tour, the Yuba rider Tim Shaefer employs a strategy that nearly wins him the yellow jersey.  The “distract ‘em with beer” tactic, last used in the 1928 Tour de France, has never been used in an American Tour.  Despite not placing, Tim’s spirit’s are high. 

“With just 3 laps to go, the strategy that Max, Lu (my dogs in the basket) & I came up with to win the 2013 USA Pro Challenge Stage 7 in Denver is working out perfectly. Here we are nestled right between the race leader, Tejay van Garderen (yellow jersey) and Peter Sagan (green jersey), my legs were feeling great and the beers in the trailer cooler were icy cold. But alas, it wasn’t to be for 2013. Tejay would take the overall victory, and Peter would win the stage in the last few meters of the final sprint as well as the overall Sprinters Jersey.  We’ve got your numbers Tejay & Peter, just wait until next year!”

 

Edible Manhattan: Peddle to the Nettle

We were tickled pink to be featured in Edible Manhattan’s video about chef’s who use cargo bikes to do the shopping for their Manhattan eateries. We hope more businesses catch on; to quote Christophe Hille “I can’t imagine why every business doesn’t have their own cargo bike.” Fast forward to 1:44 to see Christophe in action on his Mundo.

Pedal to the Nettle – Digital Edition from Edible Manhattan on Vimeo.

We were so (literally) moved by writer Nancy Matsumoto’s recent story about chefs who have ditched their delivery trucks for two and three-wheeled clean-energy modes of transport, that we asked videographer Elizabeth Leitzell to go along for the ride.

While most restaurants get deliveries by truck, and even Greenmarket-minded chefs typically hail cabs at Union Square or schlep by van, a few instead transport their farmy bounty using not fossil fuels but their own blood, sweat and quads.

Sure, these are short distance: Back Forty West (nee Savoy) is a mere mile from Union Square, so skipping that cab saves very little gas. But that’s the final trip this produce takes, and pedaling that mile is in completely in keeping with why Peter Hoffman shops at the Greenmarket in the first place, rather than just order produce from distant time zones. For him and those like him, getting food from market to restaurant without gas is just the final link in a low-carbon food chain.

“We have the ability to make better choices,” says chef Hoffman. “Let’s solve the problem in a different way. That’s what this bike is for.” As a sticker on his custom tricycle reads: “the revolution will not be motorized.”

(Editor’s aside: I freaking love the beginning when the sign in the background reads “LIVE YOUR LIFE.” If you know Peter Hoffman, you’ll find that sentiment entirely appropriate.)

Hit play above to see and hear more. And don’t forget your bike helmet.

Full article can be found here…

Report from Pedalfest

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Here’s a video from KTVU showing all the shenanigans at Pedalfest 2013. Check out the Yuba segment around the 1:00 mark.

DSC04811We had a fantastic time at the East Bay Bike Coalition’s Pedalfest at beautiful Jack London Square this past weekend. This event was especially special, because we got to hang out with our friends in Cyclecide and Rock the Bike as well as connect with our many customers in the the East Bay.

 

photo 14DSC04912 This guy had the coolest Mundo we saw at Pedalfest with not one, but two drummers on a trailer on the back! They sure looked like they were having a lot of fun! Notice his stylish hat? Impress us at an event, and you could win one too!

photo 8 The kids loved the all-new Monkey Bars accessory. In many cases, they liked it so much, they didn’t want to get off the bike.

DSC04750The famed cargo-biking Marleau family stopped by the Yuba booth to say hi and show off the kids’ training-wheel-free bikes.

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Oakland’s Mayor Jean Quan stopped by to check out the elBoda. She was very excited to learn about the advances in ebike technology since she bought her first electric bike ten years ago (can we say ebike pioneer?) Maybe we’ll get her on one next year….

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Matt the Intern takes a break after things slow down in the late afternoon.

All in all, it was a great event! Many thanks to East Bay Bike Coalition, Bay Area Bikes and Jack London Square for hosting us!

Many thanks to Allyson Rickard for letting us use here photos. Her artwork can be seen at http://www.allysonrickard.com/

Transporting Multiple Bikes by Mundo

Periodically we repost a tutorial or other useful content from Yuba riders. This tutorial, from Gray Harrison of the Me and the Mundo blog has some great ideas about how to transport multiple bikes by Mundo. Enjoy!

There has been a lot of interest in the posting about carrying bikes on the back of my Mundo, so I’ve decided to put up some more details and a “how to” on the process.

The original inspiration for trying this out was that the Fort Collins Bike Library needed to move about 65 bikes from their storage location to the downtown library kiosk.  New Belgium Brewery was hosting a meeting of folks from around the country to plan this summers’ Tour de Fat festivities, and all the visitors needed bikes.  The plan was to ride the bikes from storage to the library, and then walk back to the storage to pick up another bike.  Repeat until done.  I volunteered to help move the bikes, but not being a fan of walking I figured there had to be a better method, and thus the Mundo Multiple Bike Loading System was born.

In front of the Bike Library
Carrying 2 bikes at a time.

The basic idea was pretty easy: get a couple of v-shaped bike trays, such as those made by ThuleYakimaRocky Mounts, mount them to the Mundo’s outriggers, and start moving bikes!  Sounds easy, and as it turned out, it really was.  A few technical details needed to be worked out, as I will show you, but it didn’t take long to figure out.

Here are the things you’ll need:
(2) full length bike trays
(4) 1″ hex-head stainless steel machine screws with the same diameter and thread pitch as the ones that come mounted in the Mundo’s outriggers.  (The stock screws might not be long enough to go through the bike tray into the fitting).
A drill
A measuring tape (to measure exactly where to drill the holes in the trays).
Some old carpet or other material to protect the frames where they contact the Mundo in transit.
(2) Yuba 3 meter Cargo Straps (or similar).
(1) hour of time to do the first installation. (Note: once everything is measured and drilled, the process of removing or installing the racks takes less than 5 minutes).

Detail 3
Here’s what the final installation looked like.  The trays are different styles only because they were the only 2 available at the time.

The most expensive part of this project were the 4 stainless steel machine screws, as the used bike trays were donated by the Fort Collins Bike Co-op.  Getting a tray or 2 for a project like this could be a bit of a stumbling block, but if you keep your eyes open you can probably find one on craigslist, your local community bike shop, or even at a metal recycling center.

Although the original inspiration for the project was a short-term job, my long-term objective was to have a way to easily carry one or more bikes with the Mundo.  I have tried towing bikes, and it is not an ideal way to transport more than one bike, or even one bike over longer distances.  This setup with the trays allows me to, for instance, carry my mountain bike to the trailhead (about 10 miles) using the Mundo instead of a car.  It’s a great way to get to and from the trails without having to ride my mountain bike on the street for a fairly long distance.  The Mundo’s electric assist makes it super-easy to get up to the foothills quickly where I can then enjoy the amazing Colorado singletrack.

In Action 1
carrying the mountain bike to the mountains.

Here are some more detailed pictures of the installation process for the trays, and for those of you who might need to transport 3 bikes, I think there is a way of mounting a 3rd, short tray on the top of the cargo rack.  You’d have to have the kind where you remove the front wheel, otherwise the bike would stick out too far and you might have a problem with too much weight hanging off the back of the rack.

Detail 5
The outrigger with one screw removed in the front and rear to allow the rack to be installed.
Detail 9
Detail showing the extra-long machine screw needed due to the extra thickness of the rack.

 

Detail 7
Lining up the hole drilled in the rack with the outriggers’ screw hole.  Note the slot in my wood deck for the Go-Getter bags’ strap to go through.
Detail 10
Here is the tray on the other side showing the holes drilled to match up with the existing screw holes in the outrigger.
Detail 11
A view from the top, the rear screw is in, the front has not been attached yet.  Also note the piece of old carpet around the top rack to protect the bike being carried from rubbing against the steel of the Mundo.
Detail 15
As long as the tray is mounted at the correct angle you should have plenty of room to pedal.  The exact placement of the tray, and where to drill the holes was the most critical measurement during the installation.
Detail 19
Here’s the mountain bike mounted on the Mundo for transport to the trailhead.
Detail 23
Here’s a closeup of how to strap the upper part of the bike to the rack of the Mundo.
Detail 21
Another view of the strap holding the bike up.
Detail 22
Using the wheel straps that come with the bike tray to hold the wheels in place.
In Action 2
And hey, I’m off to the mountains!

Thanks for taking a look, and feel free to contact me if you have any questions about carrying bikes on your Mundo.  Once the system is in place it’s easy to put on or take off as needed, and as you might expect, it gets a lot of comments as you ride through town.  And if you want to see a short video of the bike carrying a bike, go to my vine page.  If you need to carry even more bikes, you could always build a custom trailer such as this one I recently saw at the Bike Library, built to carry 5 bikes!

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