Category Archives: yuba shops

Bicycle Retailer: Dealer Tour: The Final Four

In Chicago’s working-class neighborhoods, bikes are tools for getting around town.

CHICAGO, IL (BRAIN) — On the final day of the Dealer Tour, our group made its way into Chicago’s South Side and Lower West Side, working-class neighborhoods where two modest but friendly shops are satisfying a growing demand for bicycle repairs and low-cost transportation. They fix big-box bikes with a smile—all in the name of putting more people on bikes.

We also dropped in at a business that opened less than a month ago but offers up a model for retail merchandising done right, and we finished our 13-store tour at a high-volume shop that sells as many bikes and accessories out of a single location as many multi-store operations.

After two sunny and warm days, the weatherman forecasted afternoon showers. But luckily our group pedaled through 29 flat and dry miles.

A special thanks to our ride guides from Active Transportation Alliance and SRAM. Below is a recap of stores visited on Day 3. Additional coverage and photos will be featured in our upcoming June 15 print edition.

 Read full article here….

Dealer Profile: J.C. Lind in Chicago

Located in Old Town Chicago, J.C. Lind specializes in transportation and cargo biking. Part of a growing community of biking in Chicago, they sell commuting, cargo, and kid-carrying bikes. You won’t find a mountain bike or lightweight carbon road frame in the shop. Lights, locks, fenders, childseats, yes.
San Francisco transplant Adam Aufdencamp picked up his Mundo at J.C. Lind, as did Andrew from Ding Ding, Let’s Ride, a blog following the transportation cycling movement in Chicago.
Info:
J.C. Lind
1311 N Wells St  Chicago, IL 60610
(312) 643-1670

 

San Francisco Chronicle: Cargo Bikes Carry Larger Loads

The U.S. market for bicycles that can carry several people and heavy loads is tiny, but enthusiastic. Bay Area manufacturers Xtracycle and Yuba are largely credited with introducing the cargo bike in the United States – in particular a nimble variety known as the longtail. Observers say that a number of factors, such as high gas prices, the slow economy and environmentalism, are nudging these bikes toward wider use.

“Younger Americans who live in cities are using the bicycle to go to the market and take the kids to day care,” said Jay Townley, a bicycle industry consultant. Townley’s surveys show that Generation Y and Gen X riders are more likely than Baby Boomers to put bikes to practical use.

 

Brattleboro Reformer: Peddling unique bicycles Local bike shop starts carrying special-utility rides

Peddling unique bicycles Local bike shop starts carrying special-utility rides
By DOMENIC POLI / Reformer Staff

Wednesday October 3, 2012

BRATTLEBORO — Dave Cohen likes them because they have room to store groceries, but don’t guzzle gas like a pickup truck, a spot for children to sit on their way to soccer practice, without the cumbersome size of an SUV or minivan, and offer a smooth ride, minus the expense of an Italian sports car.

They are cargo bicycles. And, after some persuading by Cohen, some are now available at Burrows Specialized Sports at 105 Main St.

Cohen is an eco-therapist who has worked as an environmental entrepreneur, educator and activist. Robert “Woody” Woodworth, the shop’s owner, said Cohen’s experience and knowledge of Earth-friendly transportation convinced him to start dealing Yuba special-utility bicycles. He now has four in stock, they include the Mundo, the elMundo (an electric-assist bike) and the Boda Boda. They sell for around $2,600.

“Dave did a lot of research and knows a lot about cargo bikes,” he said. “So I talked to some manufacturers and we decided we would give it a whirl. … There is a niche there for people who want to save trips in their car or are looking to get rid of a second car.”

Woodworth said the nearest other dealers of cargo bikes are in Boston and Burlington — both at least two hours away.

“We kind of fit in, geographically,” he said.

Cohen delivered a talk (hosted by Brattleboro Citizen Breakfast) at the Gibson-Aiken Center last Friday and spoke for 30 minutes about hhow special-utility bikes work and why they are important. The talk was followed by 10 to 15 minutes of questions, mostly about safety, from the audience. He said he was well-received.

He also demonstrated his family’s new elMundo bike, which is designed for carrying children and cargo.

“We are a car state,” Cohen told the Reformer, adding he would love to develop a stronger bicycle culture in Vermont. “These bikes are starting a conversation about how we interact with our landscapes. … Nothing has altered our landscape more than the car.”

The new line of Yuba utility bikes, designed for carrying children and cargo, and Cohen will be present for viewing at Gallery Walk at 7 p.m. on Friday.

He said the material used to make one SUV could craft 150 elMundos. He said they help reduce one’s carbon footprint and are a lot of fun to ride.

Woodworth said he rode a Mundo to Fort Dummer State Park and noticed “they’re not that heavy, considering the bikes’ size.”

Cohen said New England, in this regard, is behind the curve compared to the West Coast. He cited Portland, Ore., as the epicenter of cargo bike enthusiasts.

He said the great thing about the elMundo is its ability to harness the human body’s power and efficiency to aid the rider along with a with quiet, state-of-the-art front hub motor. Each recharge costs approximately 5 cents, he said.

Cohen founded Pedal Express, a human-powered delivery service responsible for hauling van-sized loads on specially-designed bicycles, in Berkeley, Calif., in the 1990s. Since then he has conducted presentations on transportation and ecological issues in schools and at organizations, institutions and conferences in the United States, Canada and Europe. He moved to Vermont with his family five years ago from the San Francisco Bay area and began studying ecopsychology. He now works as a psychotherapist and tries to blend body-oriented and cognitive therapies.

Cohen, who owns a car but tries to limit his use of it, said he enjoys ecopsychology because it involves the environment and entire communities, not just individual patients.

Domenic Poli can be reached at dpoli@reformer.com, or 802-254-2311, ext. 277.

Portland Preview Weekend

We are getting excited for our upcoming trip to Oregon this weekend. Portland celebrates Pedalpalooza this month and it is packed with cool bike events. Since we are sponsoring the Disaster Relief Trials, we thought it would be a good time to pack up the van and head North.  If you’re in the Portland area, stop by and say hi at one of these events (we’ll have the all-new Boda Boda to try!):

Saturday, June 16th

Kiddical Mass, PDX
1pm-3pm
Arbor Lodge Park

Join Yuba at Kidical Mass, PDX for a fun-filled circus-themed family ride! Put on your bearded lady getup or dust off your bear suit, brush up your juggling or tame a bakfiets of tiny lions. Surprises are in store! Kids must wear helmets. We ride slow enough for little ones; kids must be able to ride in a (reasonably) straight line and start & stop as required. Come ride with us!
Katie Proctor, katie.proctor at gmail daht comm, Kidical Mass PDX, 607-262-0439

Yuba Open House at Joe Bike
4-6pm
Joe Bike
3953 SE Hawthorne Blvd
Portland, OR 97214

Want to be the first of your friends to try out the all-new Boda Boda bike? Hightail to Joe Bike on Saturday for an exclusive Northwest preview of the new cargo cruiser from Yuba Bicycles.

World Naked Bike Ride, PDX
8pm-12am
Meet at the empty lot at the corner of SE Water and Salmon streets

The PDX world naked bike ride for 2012 will take place on 16 jun 2012 at 10pm. Begin gathering at 8pm at the start location – the empty lot at the corner of SE Water and Salmon streets. For more info on the ride, check out the Facebook event.

The World Naked Bike Ride is an annual, worldwide bike ride that highlights the vulnerability of cyclists everywhere and decries society’s dependence on pollution-based transport. It’s also a lot of fun and it’s free for all! Portland has the world’s largest ride–with around 10,000 people on the road in 2010 and 4-5 thousand folks in 2009 and 2011–and we are looking to break the record for the world’s largest naked ride again in 2012!

 

Sunday, June 17th

Disaster Relief Trials
10 am – 6 pm
Velo Cult
1969 NE 42ND AVE
Portland, OR

Opportunity ONE: Family Utility

  • Demo a full spectrum of cargo bikes from three shops:
    Clever Cycles, Joe Bike, and Splendid Cycles
  • See the new Yuba Boda Boda cargo cruiser
  • Learn about disaster preparation for your family and home
  • See how you can transport your family without your car, or without using your car quite as much
  • Have your questions answered by top cargo bike enthusiasts

Opportunity TWO: City Utility

  • 30 riders will navigate 30+ miles, visit 7 checkpoints, and collect 100 lbs of cargo along the way.
  • This event will provide a working draft for what a city can do with cargo bikes after a disaster
  • Create connections among city organizations both public and private for the public good

Zombie Apocalypse Ride
10:30 am – 1 pm
Velo Cult
1969 NE 42ND AVE
Portland, OR

The Zombie Apocalypse Ride is combining forces with the Disaster Relief Trials. For those that love zombies and disaster preparedness but aren’t planning to race the trials, this ride is for you. This is a fun and social ride. Dress as either a Zombie or a Survivor (self-explanatory). Prizes for best Zombie and Survivor Bike. Easy paced ride with multiple stops where various facets of surviving the post-apocalyptic zombie world will be debated.

Disaster Relief Trials, 2012

Join us for …
Disaster Relief Trials
June 17, 2012
10 am – 6 pm
Velo Cult
1969 NE 42ND AVE
Portland, ORE
ONE EVENT! TWO OPPORTUNITIES!
Opportunity ONE: Family Utility

  • Demo a full spectrum of cargo bikes from three shops:
    Clever Cycles, Joe Bike, and Splendid Cycles
  • See the new Yuba Boda Boda cargo cruiser and new Xtracyle Side Car
  • Learn about disaster preparation for your family and home
  • See how you can transport your family without your car, or without using your car quite as much
  • Have your questions answered by top cargo bike enthusiasts

Opportunity TWO: City Utility

  • 30 riders will navigate 30+ miles, visit 7 checkpoints, and collect 100 lbs of cargo along the way.
  • This event will provide a working draft for what a city can do with cargo bikes after a disaster
  • Create connections among city organizations both public and private for the public good

Special thanks to the presenters, organizations, and supporters of DRTpdx 2012:

142nd Fighter Wing // The Oregon Food Bank // Oregon Red Cross // Portland Bureau of Emergency Management // Multnomah County Emergency Management // Portland Fire Bureau // ARES (amateur radio) // Portland Neighborhood Emergency Teams // OHSTAR: Oregon Humane Society Technical Animal Rescue // Portland Businesses By Cargo Bike // Cargo Bike Food and Beverage Vendors

A hearty thank you to Sky and everyone at Velo Cult for the generous use of the space!

Meet the Cruiser Boutique

Green Gear Guru has been producing bags, wallets and accessories out of upcycled materials for years. Need a backpack made out of bike inner tubes for your mountain biking buddy who’s going back to school? They’ve got you covered.

 

The company outgrew the workshop in the back of their retail store. Special Ed teacher, Ryan Balciar, adopted this space and has created a niche bike shop for cruiser and cargo bike aficionados. Basically, if its heavy and fun, the Cruiser Boutique carries it.

 

Ryan has been very successful getting his start-up bike shop off the ground. Hosting weekly cruiser rides gets new people on bikes, and builds a community with existing customers. He also has discovered that connecting with the local bike coalition and bicycle bloggers has helped spread the word about his niche shop.

 

YUBA BIKES:
You opened the Cruiser Boutique inside of an established local business. What were the challenges and advantages of opening a niche bike shop this way?
RB:
For me, the advantages included opening a shop in a pre-existing retail environment alongside my best friends.  When I set up shop, there was already a loyal customer base and many of the logistics (employees, accountants, insurance, etc.) were already in place.  This allowed me to focus on my passion rather than many of the aspects of opening a business that I find dreadful.  I still spend too much time working on computers rather than riding.  There are disadvantages as well.  There are days when the shop floor is full of merchandise that is being shipped around the country, our location is not ideal from a strictly retail standpoint, and we have a lot of different people working here that do not have a lot of shop experience (designers and interns) and this can be a little overwhelming for walk in customers.
YB:
Your bike shop specializes in cruisers and cargo bikes. How has focusing on such a niche market helped you to establish and grow your business?
RB:
We have a large cruiser scene here in Boulder, with multiple meeting points.  We have had a large group meeting at our shop for the last couple years, so offering people the opportunity to customize their bikes before the ride starts seemed like a good plan.  There are always people that need lights and other basic accessories as well.  I have had various cargo bikes over the years, and carrying Yubas fits in well with our goals of a more sustainable world.
YB:
As a new bike shop, how do you recruit new customers? How do you retain your current customers? What strategies do you think would be helpful to other bike shops to learn from?
RB:
We already had a large following of local customers from the Green Guru brand.  People love  products and want to support our business. Hosting a large weekly social ride helps with word of mouth marketing and creates a fun interactive shopping experience.  Selling someone a cruiser than taking them out on it for a night of riding really helps to build a loyal customer base.
YB:
What is your favorite use for your Yuba Mundo?
RB:
This is a tough one.  By far my favorite use is hauling around the love of my life, although I know that she would rather be on her own bike and is just sitting back there looking pretty to make me happy.  We also have a custom stereo system that we attach for some of the cruiser rides and this combines two of my favorite things.  We have a lot of snow mixed with sunny days and cold nights, so there tends to be a lot of ice in the winter.  This is one of the times that having a Yuba is advantageous, as it seems far more stable on slippery terrain.

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