Category Archives: FAQ’s

What is the best option to attach a trail a bike to a Yuba Mundo or Boda Boda?

The quick answer is: IT’S COMPLICATED.

Parents love the trail-a-bike systems because they make a lot of sense as to help kids transition between riding on the rear rack of a Mundo or Boda Boda and riding their own bikes independently. They also are easy to lock up and leave at school when you drop off the child.

Unfortunately, these systems are not made equal, and each hitch attachment presents its own challenges to connect with the Mundo.



Build Your Own Custom Mundo!

So you want to build up your own Yuba Mundo Cargo Bike?  

Here’s a post to help you cover the basics.  

Sweet Custom Tangerine Yuba Mundo Cargo Bike

Sweet Custom Tangerine Yuba Mundo Cargo Bike. (With Monkey Bars, Bread Basket, Stand Alone, etc.)


The foundation of your dream ride!

A custom Yuba Mundo is a great way to show off your personal riding style, from the look to the ride.  Here are some basic components to consider when building your Mundo:

– Yuba Mundo Frameset 

 – Rear Wheel – The Mundo’s rear drop-outs are 14mm, not 3/8″ (10mm).  So, you’ve got some options here:

  • Purchase a Yuba Mundo Rear cargo bike wheel.  This is the easiest and likely the cheapest way to go unless you already have a rear wheel.
  • Purchase a set of Yuba Axle Adapters.  These fit over the round axle and space a 3/8″ wheel in a Mundo dropout.
  • Find/Build your own wheel based on a BMX-style 14mm axle.  (You’re on your own here.)

    14mm to 10mm Axle Adapters

    14mm to 10mm Axle Adapters

Yuba Seat post (it’s an unusual size at 31.8mm x 500mm, so its easiest to get it from us)

You can purchase a seatpost from Yuba. Our seatposts are 500mm.  This is needed if you are over 6-feet tall.  Otherwise, you can purchase a 31.8 x 350-400mm from most bike shops.

Wheelskirts (if you ever are going to have children ride on the back, they’re required.)

We also strongly recommend these accessories:

– Utility deck  — You can make your own, but in case you’d rather not…

– Stand-Alone Kickstand — Nobody makes a stand like the “Stand-Alone”.  This kickstand ROCKS!

– Deflopilator — Keeps the front wheel straight when the bike is on the Stand Alone

And one more thing:
Mundo Chain (156 links!)

(Of course, there’s always the full line of Add-ons to trick out your new custom Mundo, such as the Bread Basket and the Go-Getter Bag.)

Custom Mundo FAQs

Rear Hub Spacing: 135 mm

Maximum Tire Clearance: 2.15 in (with standard drive train).


When you’re done, we’d love to see a picture of your Custom Mundo, either by email, @YubaBicycles on Twitter and Instagram, or Facebook.

Child Bike Seat, Bike Trailer, or Cargo Bike? – Part Two

Bike Trailer or Kids Bike seat or Cargo Bike? In Part One of this series, we explored a general overview of traveling with children by bike, some general considerations that will help you select a suitable bike for the job, and the benefits and challenges of choosing the bike over the car. In this post (Part Two) of this series, we will examine some of the different types of bikes available to carry kids, such as a child bike seat, bike trailer, and cargo bikes.  We conclude this series in Part Three with some rider profiles and other resources to help you decide how to travel with children by bike.

(Note: While we are endeavoring to give a comprehensive overview, we can not possibly discuss all available options here. We hope to give you a good amount of information to make an informed decision, or a good starting point should you decide to do more research. Please send us feedback to info at yubabikes dot com.)

What are the options for traveling by bicycle with children? 

There are various types of bicycles and accessories that are suited to carrying your kids and gear by bike. The best solution for you will be a decision based on your individual riding needs, personal preference, and available budget (as discussed in Part One of this series). This post (Part Two) will give an overview of the various types of bikes available, some of the pros and cons of each style, and then explore some of the brands and products in each type.

The New Family Van

The New Family Van

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Child Bike Seat, Bike Trailer, or Cargo Bike? – Part One

There are many options for traveling by bicycle with your children.  Should you choose a child bike seat, bike trailer, or a cargo bike?  Making the best choice for your needs can be a bit confusing.  We have created this primer series to help you choose the best set-up for your needs when traveling with children by bicycle.  

(This part is intended as an overview of some general considerations that will help you to select a suitable bike for the job, and examines some of the benefits and challenges of choosing the bike over the car.  Part Two examines the various choices available for meeting your needs, including different bike styles and accessory options such as a child bike seat, bike trailer, cargo bikes, and gear carriers.  Your best choice will be influenced by your needs, which you will better understand by reading (this) Part One.)

A Child Bike Seat Alternative: Monkey Bars for the Yuba Mundo make it safe and fun to carry kids by bike!

Child Bike Seat Alternative: Yuba Mundo with Monkey Bars make it safe and fun to carry kids by bike!

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Report from Pedalfest


Here’s a video from KTVU showing all the shenanigans at Pedalfest 2013. Check out the Yuba segment around the 1:00 mark.

DSC04811We had a fantastic time at the East Bay Bike Coalition’s Pedalfest at beautiful Jack London Square this past weekend. This event was especially special, because we got to hang out with our friends in Cyclecide and Rock the Bike as well as connect with our many customers in the the East Bay.


photo 14DSC04912 This guy had the coolest Mundo we saw at Pedalfest with not one, but two drummers on a trailer on the back! They sure looked like they were having a lot of fun! Notice his stylish hat? Impress us at an event, and you could win one too!

photo 8 The kids loved the all-new Monkey Bars accessory. In many cases, they liked it so much, they didn’t want to get off the bike.

DSC04750The famed cargo-biking Marleau family stopped by the Yuba booth to say hi and show off the kids’ training-wheel-free bikes.

DSC04870 DSC04871

Oakland’s Mayor Jean Quan stopped by to check out the elBoda. She was very excited to learn about the advances in ebike technology since she bought her first electric bike ten years ago (can we say ebike pioneer?) Maybe we’ll get her on one next year….


Matt the Intern takes a break after things slow down in the late afternoon.

All in all, it was a great event! Many thanks to East Bay Bike Coalition, Bay Area Bikes and Jack London Square for hosting us!

Many thanks to Allyson Rickard for letting us use here photos. Her artwork can be seen at

Safe Routes to Schools National Conference


The 4th SRTS National Conference Heads West
August 13-15, 2013

The 4th Safe Routes to School National Conference is making its way to California’s state capital this Summer. The first state to enact SRTS legislation in 1999, California has played a key role in the birth of the Safe Routes to School movement and remains a national leader in SRTS strategies. The Sacramento region — home to many innovative SRTS programs and land use and transportation policies, as well as its extensive trail system and many recreational opportunities — provides the perfect venue for this event.

Join us on the West Coast this summer for this not-to-be-missed national conference focused on providing safe, convenient and fun opportunities for children to bike and walk to school!

The fourth Safe Routes to School National Conference is hosted by the Local Government Commission. It is co-presented by the National Center for Safe Routes to School and the Safe Routes to School National Partnership.

The Safe Routes to School movement has come a long way in a very short time and is resulting in healthier schools and communities throughout the nation.  I see that growth reflected in the Safe Routes to School conference too, both in the number of participants and in the breadth of sectors and champions that are represented.  The Safe Routes to School conference is a fantastic opportunity for everyone to learn, network, get inspired and then go back home and strengthen their Safe Routes to School efforts.

– Deb Hubsmith, Director, Safe Routes to School National Partnership

To register for the conference, please click here.

Mother Earth News: “A Guide to Cargo Bikes”

Bike culture is exploding in cities across the world. Whether people are riding folding bikes to the commuter train, slipping through traffic on streamlined single-speeds, or carrying children and groceries on their cargo bikes, bicycles are making urban life more dynamic and enjoyable. Cargo bikes — specialty-form or retrofitted — are a good option for cycle commuters who want to fully replace the car with green transportation that works for everyday life. In this excerpt from On Bicycles: 50 Ways the New Bike Culture Can Change Your Life (New World Library, 2012), Finley Fagan explains the different kinds of cargo bikes and their benefits.

Read more here…

Yuba Safety Check

Keep Kids Safe with the Yuba Safety Check

You wouldn’t take your kid for a ride without a helmet, would you? Of course not. Did you know that there’s more you can do to ensure your child’s safety on the bike? Please take a minute to review the Yuba safety specifications, and ensure that your bike is compliant with the safe intended use.

If you’re riding with children under 40 lbs:

  • Children should ride in a Peanut Shell Child Seat, which should be attached firmly to the back rack.
  • Foot support should be installed and utilized.

mundo_wheelskirts_email If you’re riding with children under 18 years old (but over 40 lbs):

  • Wheel Guards are required for all passengers under 18 years old to keep shoelaces, hands and feet out of the spinning rear wheel. Purchase Wheel Guards from your local dealer or online here.
  • Educate your passengers about the dangers of spinning wheels.
  • boda_wheelskirts_emailUse foot supports for shorter passengers, and ensure that they are properly installed by checking the bolts regularly.
  • Give your passengers something to hang on to, make sure that the Hold on Bar or Rumble Strap is tight and adjusted properly for your passengers.

At Yuba Bicycles, we take the safety of our riders and their passengers very seriously. If you have any questions about best practices for safe riding with passengers, please contact your local bike dealer.

Plans to make Wheelskirts for V2 Mundos can be found here.

Pipe Dreams: Bike Vacations with Kids

It’s a Truism: kids love bicycles. They love riding them. They love spinning the pedals backwards and watching the chain move. They love climbing up on a Soft Spot and hitting the saddle shouting “Go! Go! Go!” Like big people, they love the feeling of wind on their faces and the freedom of adventure.

The thing is, “grownups” love adventure too, and want to share the spirit of exploring with their families and friends. Unfortunately, many bike tour routes are geared toward groups of adult travelers. These routes are not appropriate for families traveling with children in trailers, on come-along bikes, or with kids who ride a few miles independently, and then climb onto Mommy’s cargo bike for the rest of the trip.

At Yuba, we love going on bicycle adventures with our little friends. We’ve compiled a list of kid-friendly bike touring routes, so that you, your family and friends can feel empowered to pack the tent and the diaper bag and hit the road. In general, these routes start and stop at a destination that does not require a car to get to. If you have suggestions for other routes, please add a comment to this post, so that other people can try your route.

Angel Island (CA)
Angel Island is a California State Historic Park located in the heart of the San Francisco Bay. Because it is relatively easy to access and offers amazing views of the San Francisco Bay Area, camping fills up fast (9 months in advance!), so book early.

Angel Island has a car-free, paved loop trail that enables visitors to explore West Coast history, from the Native American civil rights protests of the 1960’s to Civil War garrisons in the 1860’s. It also offers sweeping views of the entire San Francisco Bay. Please be aware that the trail, while paved, and car-free is by no means flat.

For more information, please check the Angel Island website.

Beal’s Point at Folsom Lake (CA)
A mere 32 miles from Old Sacramento, CA along the car-free American River Trail, this campground has many amenities to offer families: a lake for swimming, boat rentals, a snack bar and more.

For more information, please go to the Folsom Lake website.

Chesapeake & Ohio Canal (DC, MD, WV)
The C&O Canal was built as a way to access Western wealth, and began operation in the early 19th century. Operating for nearly 100 years the canal was a lifeline for communities along the Potomac River as coal, lumber and agricultural products floated down the waterway to market. The 184 mile canal path was converted to recreation land in the 1970’s, and functions as a bike path connecting Washington DC with Cumberland, MD.

The park features 30 free hiker-bike campgrounds every 6-8 miles along the canal route, so camping is easy; stay in these campgrounds is limited to one night per trip. It is possible to continue onto the Great Allegheny Passage to travel all the way to Pittsburgh by bike.

For more information, please visit the C&O Canal website.

George S. Mickelson Trail (SD)
The George S. Mickelson Trail allows access to South Dakota’s famed Black Hills, and National Forests. The trail is 109 miles long, with over 100 converted railroad bridges and 4 rock-hewn tunnels. The trail surface is graveled with limestone. Although the grade never exceeds 4%, some parts of the trail could be considered strenuous for younger/out of shape riders.

For more information, please see the George S. Mickelson Trail website.

Great Allegheny Passage (PA, MD)
The Great Allegheny Passage (GAP) rail-trail offers 141 miles of hiking and biking between Cumberland, MD, and Homestead, PA, near Pittsburgh. In Cumberland, the GAP joins the C&O Canal Towpath, creating a continuous trail experience, 325 miles long, to Washington, DC.

There are several campgrounds near the GAP, please see the the GAP website for more information.

Natchez Trace (MS, TN, AL)
The Natchez Trace is a 444 mile parkway and bike path that follows an ancient bison migratory path from Natchez, MS to Nashville, TN. There are historical sites covering 10,000 years of history, B&B’s, trees, bike camping and cutesy towns all along the route.

Because the parkway is extremely safe, and cars only drive  50 mph for its entire length, it is considered to be a great route for families seeking to do a bike tour with kids. The route is also relatively flat and smooth, so riders encumbered with passengers, camping gear and other cargo won’t have to kill themselves to have a good time.

For more information, please see the Natchez Trace website.

Trail of the Coeur d’Alenes (ID, WY)
Spanning 171 miles between Mullen, WY and Plummer, ID, in the northern Idaho panhandle, the Coeur d’Alenes trails offer paved and gravel trails for cyclists of all abilities, following old railroad lines.

For more information, please see the Friends of the Trail of the Coeur d’Alenes website.

Yellowstone National Park (Fall and Spring Biking Seasons) (ID, MT, WY)
In the seasons between when the snow begins to fall, or before it has completely melted and the summer tourist season, there are a few weeks a year when the roads in Yellowstone are open to self-propelled travelers only. Every spring and fall, cyclists enjoy this special time of year to give them private access to the mysteries of Yellowstone.

Weather can be inclement, so please plan carefully. There is camping available at Mammoth Hot Springs.

For more information, please go to the Yellowstone National Park Website.

Hum of the City: We tried it: Yuba Boda Boda

Here’s a exerpt from a review from Hum of the City, a fantastic blog about being car-free with children in a hilly city (San Francisco).

“…This is an extremely easy bike to ride, both with and without kids aboard. The Boda Boda looks and feels like a beach cruiser, with wide handlebars and a relaxed and upright ride, but has massively increased carrying capacity. We had some friends who were only occasional riders try it, and even when it was loaded they took off without a wobble. This is common to some extent with all midtails, but our loaner Boda Boda had an advantage over the MinUte: a step-through frame. Even shorter riders could get on and off with contorting over the top tube or round-housing a kid sitting on the back deck.
The Boda Boda is a slender bike that can move easily through traffic. It has the same kind of rear supports as the Mundo, which are handy because they can hold up the bags or be used as footrests for older riders, but they are much narrower than the ones on the Mundo (as are the bags themselves). A Mundo with the Go Getter bags packed is three feet across, wider than many bike trailers, and it can be nerve-wracking to ride one in San Francisco’s narrow bike lanes and heavy traffic—as a result, I sometimes see Mundos riding on the sidewalk, even though this is illegal in San Francisco. The Boda Boda’s Baguettes, even fully packed, still lie pretty flat and make it possible to weave the bike through pinch points without a second thought (Baguettes can apparently be used on a Mundo as well, by the way)…”

Read the full review here…