Author Archives: cargolady

Pedalfest at Jack London Square

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Pedalfest rolls into Jack London Square to celebrate all-things cycling at the Bay Area’s premier bicycle festival. This free annual event will pack the waterfront with more than 20,000 biking enthusiasts enjoying bicycle-themed entertainment, food and exhibits including:

  • Cycling daredevils performing in a 30-foot banked wooden Whiskeydrome
  • Eye-popping two-wheeled stunts by pro riders Mike Steidley and Chris Clark
  • Rock the Bike’s pedal-powered stage featuring live music
  • TGC Actions Sport/BMX Stunt Team performances
  • Oaklandish’s kids bicycle parade
  • U.S. Bicycling Hall of Fame vintage bikes
  •  Brompton bike folding contest
  • Bicycle rodeo for children
  • Pedal-powered food
  • Pedal-powered rides by Cyclecide
  • Dazzling collection of new, vintage and handmade bikes
  • Bike Stand demo stage by Bay Area Bikes
  • Bike trivia dunk tank
  • Pedalfest Pig Roast by Lungomare: www.pedalfestpigroast.eventbrite.com
  • Bicycle vendors, artisans and more
  • Selection of beers available from New Belgium Brewing Co., with all proceeds going to support the advocacy work of the East Bay Bicycle Coalition

For additional information and/or to volunteer, visit www.pedalfestjacklondon.com

Making a Trailer for a Boda Boda

 Occasionally, we host a guest blog post about how to do something terribly interesting or useful with our bikes. This guest post is from Tim Schaeffer, a dog-lovin’ Boda Boda rider in Colorado,  teaches us how to repurpose a kid trailer for hauling cargo, and how to attached the trailer to a Boda Boda.

Although I have managed to haul a respectful amount of gear on my Yuba bicycle alone, I wanted to have the option to haul even more when necessary.

My goal was to complete the project with respect to the following:
·         a small budget
·         recycled materials (when possible)
·         make it strong, safe, and reliable
·         make no modifications to the bicycle
·         hopefully make it visually appealing.

I started by searching for a used trailer at yard sales and on Craig’s List, and found a stinky (it really was) old double child trailer.

The newer ones look nicer and have cooler wheels, but I went for an older, less expensive one with bad wheel bearings.

It also had worn out, flat tires and was missing the top.

trailer_instructable01I stripped the top frame and nylon parts off, cleaned the frame, and replaced the wheel bearings and bearing cones myself.

I also found a great deal on a pair of new “Big Apple” tires & bought 2 tubes on sale.

I used some citrus-based cleaner to remove some old decals and other crud that soap and water couldn’t.

A friend trued the wheels for me in exchange for some excellent, locally brewed craft beer.

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I considered several hitch options, but the Boda “Love Handles” present interference issues with most.

As I said earlier, I did not want to drill, tap, or otherwise permanently modify the bicycle frame, nor did I want to attach any clamps that could damage or mar the frame.

So I scrounged the internet for the best deal I could find on a Burley Forged Hitch & round-tube Flex Adapter kit.

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It is impossible to mount the trailer (as Burley intended) to the Boda with just these items, so I utilized some scrap 6061 aluminum flat bar I had in my garage workshop.

The shorter piece is 3/16” aluminum that I bored holes in using my old drill press.

The top hole is for the wheel axle, the bottom one is where I mounted the Burley Forged Hitch.

I used a very strong bolt to mount the hitch to the aluminum flat bar and torqued it very tightly using a vise and breaker bar.

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I finished the aluminum using a belt sander, a Scotch Brite pad and elbow grease.

The narrow bar is 1/8” aluminum, and is used as a “torque strut”, absorbing any twisting or forward moment from the hitch mount.

This keeps the hitch mount from pivoting forward (heavy breaking) or backward.

The torque arm has small bends in both ends to keep it flush with the mounting points.

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Once I mounted my homemade hitch brackets and the hitch mount to the bicycle and then hooked up the trailer, I noticed that the trailer was offset about 6” to the left of center.

Dang!   This I didn’t care for, but it wasn’t because of anything that I had done.

So I measured precisely and cut off part of the trailer tongue so the trailer would be centered behind the rear wheel. All this while knowing full well that it would reduce the distance between the rear wheel of the bicycle and the front edge of the trailer.  Below you can see how tight the clearance is (about 1”), but the trailer is centered precisely  behind the rear wheel!  When the trailer pivoted, the clearance would diminish slightly, but still did not contact the rear tire.

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I wanted a bigger safety margin and the ability to hang stuff off the front of the trailer a bit.  So the next step was to reuse that piece of tubing to extend the trailer arm, thereby increasing the wheel-to-trailer gap to a safer distance.

One quick cut, two nice welds and viola’, I have my extended trailer tongue.

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I forgot to take photos while I was building the bamboo deck for the trailer, sorry.

Suffice to say that I used a package of bamboo flooring that had been damaged slightly during shipping and was marked down in price.

It was tongue and groove style flooring, so I used my table saw and radial arm saw to cut the bamboo to size.

All of the mounting hardware is stainless steel from the local hardware store.

The paint is Testor’s model paint that I found at the local hobby shop.

Below is the mount & trailer connected to the bicycle.  Notice the larger gap between the rear tire and the front of the trailer.

These photos show the original 1/8” thick hitch mount, I later made a new one out of 3/16” aluminum to eliminate a minor wiggle.

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Enjoy your Fourth of July holiday!  I know that I will using my new rig to go to the picnic and concert in the park.

From the Mailbag: Greg N’s Mundo Review

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“My friend Peter came to town with two friends to play a show with two other musicians. He had no car on this trip. We rode our Yuba Mundo (black, shown here locked to two friends’ bikes) and carried a green Brompton folding bicycle for Peter to ride back to our place. On the return trip, I carried his luggage and his guitar on the Yuba. Perfect. Best part: drafting three Lycra-clad carbon-frame-riding roadies for four miles on the trail–and keeping up with a pannier and a Brompton strapped to the cargo bike, comfy 2.35″ tires-and wearing jeans and cowboy boots. They kept shifting up and looking back to see if Brianna and I were still there. I thanked them kindly as we peeled off at our turn, saying: “Cargo bikes are fast!” Their response: “Well, that one is!” Just another great ride on the Mundo.”

-Greg N.

Safe Routes to Schools National Conference

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The 4th Safe Routes to School National Conference is making its way to California’s state capital this Summer. The first state to enact SRTS legislation in 1999, California has played a key role in the birth of the Safe Routes to School movement and remains a national leader in SRTS strategies. The Sacramento region — home to many innovative SRTS programs and land use and transportation policies, as well as its extensive trail system and many recreational opportunities — provides the perfect venue for this event.

Join the Safe Routes to Schools National Partnership on the West Coast this summer for this not-to-be-missed national conference focused on providing safe, convenient and fun opportunities for children to bike and walk to school!

The fourth Safe Routes to School National Conference is hosted by the Local Government Commission. It is co-presented by the National Center for Safe Routes to School and the Safe Routes to School National Partnership.

Yuba Bicycles is delighted to be a Silver Sponsor of the 4th annual Safe Routes to Schools National Conference. 

People Powered Movement Photo Contest

As you may know, we have partnered with the Alliance for Biking and Walking this year as part of our commitment to transportation cycling. We believe in the work they do making our streets safer for riders of all ages and abilities. We wanted to support local bike coalitions across North America that are making our streets safer, and our journeys a little bit more sustainable. 
yuba_thumbSo, if you work for or know of a bike coalition that is in need of a Yuba Mundo, let them know about the photo contest. 

Full rules and information can be found here. 

 

Boda Boda Beyond Thunderdome

Some of our customers really exemplify the Yuba spirit; they put a lot of effort into helping others put the fun into bicycles and really having a ball on their Yubas. We’ve shown you pictures of Tim’s Pimped Out Boda Boda Before – but have you seen it dressed up as a autogyro from Mad Max? No, neither had we. 

Enjoy, 

Yuba

I’m a both a Ride Leader and Chain Guard (safety) member of both the Denver Bike Night and the Denver Cruiser Ride. Last week our theme was “Mad Max, Beyond Thunderdome”, so I dressed up both myself and the bike as the Auto-Gyro Pilot. I had a great time and so did Max & Lu.

-Tim

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Yuba Summer Fun Photo Contest

Win Fabulous Yuba Apparel!

We have fantastic new Yuba apparel – hats and aprons – and we want you to win some in our summer photo contest.

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This is Marc and Matt modeling our new Yuba apparel. Don’t they look purdy?

Any photo of you doing summertime activities on your Yuba is eligible, from hauling a BBQ, to taking your SUP to the lake, to taking a bunch of kidlets and their swim things to the pool.

To enter, simply post the photo to the Yuba Bicycles Facebook page, post to Twitter (#yubasummerfun), email to info at yubabikes dot com, or post to our Instagram (#yubasummerfun).

1st Prize is a Yuba Apron and a Yuba Hat.
2nd Prize is a Yuba Hat.
3rd Prize is a Yuba Apron.

Entries must be received before July 8, 2013, 9am PST. Submissions are welcome from all over the globe, but prizes will only be given to residents of North America. Judging will be performed by Yuba Staff.

Update: The Entries So Far

@NikkiNafziger @TinyHelmets fb_ian_capezzano fb_jackie_grant fb_jackie_grant2 fb_kane_hogan fb_martin_robb fb_philip_mielke @BlondeXtine @FatPowerBikes @NikkiNafziger_2 @tinyhelmets_1 @tinyhelmets_2

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@kyle_blake2 @kyle_blake fb_jackie_grant3 dave_cohen fb_ouedsetrios_rafting @itsakev

 

Hi-Consumption: ELMUNDO BIONX ELECTRIC CARGO BIKE BY YUBA

elMundo BionX Electric Cargo Bike
Launched back in 2006 right here in California, Yuba set out with a goal to create cargo bicycles that were practical for getting groceries and running daily errands. Benjamin Sarrazin now introduces us to his latest model in the El Mundo BionX electric cargo bike.

Constructed from a steel frame with an extended wheel base, the 21 speed bicycle features a 455 watt electric motor that will give rider’s a nice boost as they pedal through town. The bike’s rechargeable battery is good for a range of almost 40 miles, and has plenty of room out back for groceries, and even small children. The electric elMundo will set you back about $3,000.

 Read full article here…

The Washington Times: Summer Bike Gear Review

 

HALF MOON BAY, Calif., June 15, 2013 — Summer’s the time to get outside and enjoy plenty of time in the sunshine. It’s a lot easier on a bicycle, whether you’re zooming along city streets or blazing down mountain trails. Here are some key items — from helmet to jersey to that ideal bike that will help you enjoy the best of the season. All are products that have gotten rave reviews from sport-minded women, and on top of that, I’ve wear-tested them myself.

Yuba Boda Boda Bicycle

Yuba Boda Boda Bicycle (Photo: Yuba Bicycles)
Make your bicycle life more of a joy and less of a pain when you haul things around on Yuba’s Boda Boda cargo bike. The lightest and most compact cargo bicycle on the market today, it hauls your groceries, your kids, and even your surfboard. The variety of options allow you to configure the bike for your lifestyle, whether it’s a step-over or step-through frame, running boards, kids’ seat, baguette bag, or straps for that surfboard. The bike even comes in an electric version, which is handy for those windy days or when you’re hauling a lot of gear. Yuba Boda Boda Bicycle, from $1,199.

Read more: http://communities.washingtontimes.com/neighborhood/sportfolio/2013/jun/15/summer-bike-gear-review/#ixzz2WVhmWi4H