Author Archives: cargolady

Man Pedals Across America with his Dog on a Mundo

A Texas man is pedaling his bike across the United States with his dog in a grassroots campaign to support nonprofit animal shelters and urge pet seekers to avoid so-called puppy mills.
Mike Minnick, 38, and his five-year-old border collie mix Bixby have visited more than 50 animal shelters during their yearlong adventure that has brought them from easternmost Maine to Washington State—7,300 miles and counting. “There are so many beautiful dogs desperately in need of a home and friendship,” says Minnick, who adopted Bixby from a shelter in his former hometown of Austin, Texas. “If you love animals, donate to your local shelter. Puppies should not be a for-profit commodity.”
Minnick’s journey across America on two wheels with Bixby has a secondary goal: to inspire Americans to bicycle for fun and fitness. The former smoker took up cycling as a way to lose weight and kick his cigarette habit. “I used to get in my car to drive two blocks to buy cigarettes,” he says. “Now I’m in the best shape of my life and happier than ever.” Minnick, Bixby and their cargo bike loaded with more than 100 pounds of camping gear, dog food and a dog bed mounted to the rear rack attract crowds wherever they stop. Most long-distance bicyclists choose lightweight bicycles and carry minimal gear. That wasn’t an option for Minnick, who rides a Mundo cargo bike from Yuba Bicycles. “I won’t set any speed records. We go slow and steady and enjoy the views.” Minnick’s journey began in September 2013 in Lubec, Maine. From there they pedaled the East Coast to Key West, Fla., before heading to New Orleans and Texas. From Texas they headed northward through Oklahoma, Colorado, Wyoming and Montana to Washington. They are now heading down the West Coast in advance of winter.
Minnick will be in California’s Bay Area in early November. Minnick and Bixby will visit Yuba Bicycles headquarters in Petaluma, Calif., where Yuba will hold a public party and family friendly bike ride to the Petaluma animal shelter, followed by free food and beer for supporters of the Petaluma shelter. The party’s date will be announced in early November. Minnick has no plans to stop pedaling. “When I walked away from my life in Austin I had a nice home and great friends but I was in a rut. My life was flashing before my eyes. Now I wake up everyday excited. This is the most fun, challenging, rewarding and adventurous thing I've ever done. We live in one of the most geographically amazing and scenically beautiful countries in the world. Bixby and I get to see it, meet its people and pedal it under my power, using no gasoline and living like kings for next to nothing.” View and download photographs of Mike and Bixby and their Yuba Mundo cargo bike at the link below. Follow Minnick and donate to his cause at and track his journey at

Boda Boda Monkey Bars

Have you been wondering how to convert Monkey bars into Boda Boda Compatible Monkey bars? Here are a couple quick easy steps explaining how to make Boda Boda Monkey bars from the Mundo monkey bars. Hope it helps!



What you will need:

  1. Monkey Bars
  2. 2 sets of bar tape
  3. Pipe Cutter or Bandsaw
  4. 9/16 diameter Aluminum(2-20″ sections and 2-15 inch sections)
  5. 6mm or 1/4″ drill bit

Outside Support Rods

  1. Cut to size


-Remove 365mm from the center of both inside support rods (this is the rod with a hole in the center)

  • 3

-Discard the middle section

2. Join together using custom connection rods

-Cut two 510mm rod using 9/16” diameter structurally sound steel or aluminum4

-Insert connection rods into outside support rods5

-Mark hole location of support rods onto both side of inside rods7

-Remove connection rods from outside support rods

-Drill 6mm or ¼” holes at each marked location



Inside Support Rods

1. Cut to size12

-Remove 365mm from the center of both inside support rods (this is the rod with a hole in the center)

-Discard the middle section

2. Join together using custom connection rods

-Mark the distance from the end of the inside to the edge9

-Add distance together and cut an inside support rod of that size


-Repeat for second side14



  1. Assemble monkey bars using standard monkey bar instructions, but ensure bolt passes through connecting rod holes to pin the assembly
  2. Wrap monkey bars with bike tape  to protect against sharp edges


Thank you Sellwood Cycle of Portland for the great idea!

**Warning cutting bars does void warranty on monkey bars

Just a few great reasons to Bike to School this year!

Biking to School is great for your health, the environment, and your wallet. Now you have the facts, so make the change and bike instead of driving! Pick up a new Yuba Cargo Bike at your local Yuba Dealer or at and receive free Bike to School Supplies: 1 Hold On & 1 Soft Spot -or- 1 Ring & 1 Soft Spot. Use Yuba Dealer Code: BIKE2SCHOOL
*Offer valid until 10/31/14, Continental U.S. only.


Build Your Own Custom Mundo!

So you want to build up your own Yuba Mundo Cargo Bike?  

Here’s a post to help you cover the basics.  

Sweet Custom Tangerine Yuba Mundo Cargo Bike

Sweet Custom Tangerine Yuba Mundo Cargo Bike. (With Monkey Bars, Bread Basket, Stand Alone, etc.)


The foundation of your dream ride!

A custom Yuba Mundo is a great way to show off your personal riding style, from the look to the ride.  Here are some basic components to consider when building your Mundo:

– Yuba Mundo Frameset 

 – Rear Wheel – The Mundo’s rear drop-outs are 14mm, not 3/8″ (10mm).  So, you’ve got some options here:

  • Purchase a Yuba Mundo Rear cargo bike wheel.  This is the easiest and likely the cheapest way to go unless you already have a rear wheel.
  • Purchase a set of Yuba Axle Adapters.  These fit over the round axle and space a 3/8″ wheel in a Mundo dropout.
  • Find/Build your own wheel based on a BMX-style 14mm axle.  (You’re on your own here.)

    14mm to 10mm Axle Adapters

    14mm to 10mm Axle Adapters

Yuba Seat post (it’s an unusual size at 31.8mm x 500mm, so its easiest to get it from us)

You can purchase a seatpost from Yuba. Our seatposts are 500mm.  This is needed if you are over 6-feet tall.  Otherwise, you can purchase a 31.8 x 350-400mm from most bike shops.

Wheelskirts (if you ever are going to have children ride on the back, they’re required.)

We also strongly recommend these accessories:

– Utility deck  — You can make your own, but in case you’d rather not…

– Stand-Alone Kickstand — Nobody makes a stand like the “Stand-Alone”.  This kickstand ROCKS!

– Deflopilator — Keeps the front wheel straight when the bike is on the Stand Alone

And one more thing:
Mundo Chain (156 links!)

(Of course, there’s always the full line of Add-ons to trick out your new custom Mundo, such as the Bread Basket and the Go-Getter Bag.)

Custom Mundo FAQs

Rear Hub Spacing: 135 mm

Maximum Tire Clearance: 2.15 in (with standard drive train).


When you’re done, we’d love to see a picture of your Custom Mundo, either by email, @YubaBicycles on Twitter and Instagram, or Facebook.

Sarrazin Takes the Tahoe SUP Cup!

SUP and bike

Yuba Bicycle’s founder on his way to the podium

Yuba Bicycles founder Benjamin Sarrazin is not just a cargo biking pioneer: he’s also a champion paddleboarder. Sarrazin recently won the O’Neill Tahoe Cup, a three-race standup paddleboard series held on Lake Tahoe. He took first place in the Tahoe Cup’s elite men’s category following his second-place finish in the 22-mile race across the lake on Sept. 15.

Sarrazin, who can frequently be seen riding in Petaluma with his Boda Boda and Mundo with a Boga brand paddleboard strapped to the side loaders, took up paddleboarding around the time he launched Yuba in 2006. He spent his teens and 20s racing kayaks, so he was no stranger to paddling when he took up this new sport.

Earlier in the summer, Sarrazin took second place in the Jam from the Dam, and third in the Donner Lake Memorial race. His two seconds and one third-place finish were good enough to take the overall series victory–and a nice cash prize.

“In the last few miles my arms were cramping up bad. Twenty-two miles is a long way. But the adrenaline rush kept me going once I knew that I had beaten my closest competitor,” Sarrazin says.


Next spring, expect some big news about a new Yuba accessory that will make it even easier to carry your paddleboard or surfboard on a Mundo or Boda Boda. After all, why drive your board to the beach when you can pedal it there? “Using my cargo bikes to get my boards to the water fits with the true spirit of Yuba, which is to design bikes that allow you to get work done and carry big objects that previously required a car.”


Edible Manhattan: Peddle to the Nettle

We were tickled pink to be featured in Edible Manhattan’s video about chef’s who use cargo bikes to do the shopping for their Manhattan eateries. We hope more businesses catch on; to quote Christophe Hille “I can’t imagine why every business doesn’t have their own cargo bike.” Fast forward to 1:44 to see Christophe in action on his Mundo.

Pedal to the Nettle – Digital Edition from Edible Manhattan on Vimeo.

We were so (literally) moved by writer Nancy Matsumoto’s recent story about chefs who have ditched their delivery trucks for two and three-wheeled clean-energy modes of transport, that we asked videographer Elizabeth Leitzell to go along for the ride.

While most restaurants get deliveries by truck, and even Greenmarket-minded chefs typically hail cabs at Union Square or schlep by van, a few instead transport their farmy bounty using not fossil fuels but their own blood, sweat and quads.

Sure, these are short distance: Back Forty West (nee Savoy) is a mere mile from Union Square, so skipping that cab saves very little gas. But that’s the final trip this produce takes, and pedaling that mile is in completely in keeping with why Peter Hoffman shops at the Greenmarket in the first place, rather than just order produce from distant time zones. For him and those like him, getting food from market to restaurant without gas is just the final link in a low-carbon food chain.

“We have the ability to make better choices,” says chef Hoffman. “Let’s solve the problem in a different way. That’s what this bike is for.” As a sticker on his custom tricycle reads: “the revolution will not be motorized.”

(Editor’s aside: I freaking love the beginning when the sign in the background reads “LIVE YOUR LIFE.” If you know Peter Hoffman, you’ll find that sentiment entirely appropriate.)

Hit play above to see and hear more. And don’t forget your bike helmet.

Full article can be found here…

Report from Pedalfest


Here’s a video from KTVU showing all the shenanigans at Pedalfest 2013. Check out the Yuba segment around the 1:00 mark.

DSC04811We had a fantastic time at the East Bay Bike Coalition’s Pedalfest at beautiful Jack London Square this past weekend. This event was especially special, because we got to hang out with our friends in Cyclecide and Rock the Bike as well as connect with our many customers in the the East Bay.


photo 14DSC04912 This guy had the coolest Mundo we saw at Pedalfest with not one, but two drummers on a trailer on the back! They sure looked like they were having a lot of fun! Notice his stylish hat? Impress us at an event, and you could win one too!

photo 8 The kids loved the all-new Monkey Bars accessory. In many cases, they liked it so much, they didn’t want to get off the bike.

DSC04750The famed cargo-biking Marleau family stopped by the Yuba booth to say hi and show off the kids’ training-wheel-free bikes.

DSC04870 DSC04871

Oakland’s Mayor Jean Quan stopped by to check out the elBoda. She was very excited to learn about the advances in ebike technology since she bought her first electric bike ten years ago (can we say ebike pioneer?) Maybe we’ll get her on one next year….


Matt the Intern takes a break after things slow down in the late afternoon.

All in all, it was a great event! Many thanks to East Bay Bike Coalition, Bay Area Bikes and Jack London Square for hosting us!

Many thanks to Allyson Rickard for letting us use here photos. Her artwork can be seen at

Transporting Multiple Bikes by Mundo

Periodically we repost a tutorial or other useful content from Yuba riders. This tutorial, from Gray Harrison of the Me and the Mundo blog has some great ideas about how to transport multiple bikes by Mundo. Enjoy!

There has been a lot of interest in the posting about carrying bikes on the back of my Mundo, so I’ve decided to put up some more details and a “how to” on the process.

The original inspiration for trying this out was that the Fort Collins Bike Library needed to move about 65 bikes from their storage location to the downtown library kiosk.  New Belgium Brewery was hosting a meeting of folks from around the country to plan this summers’ Tour de Fat festivities, and all the visitors needed bikes.  The plan was to ride the bikes from storage to the library, and then walk back to the storage to pick up another bike.  Repeat until done.  I volunteered to help move the bikes, but not being a fan of walking I figured there had to be a better method, and thus the Mundo Multiple Bike Loading System was born.

In front of the Bike Library
Carrying 2 bikes at a time.

The basic idea was pretty easy: get a couple of v-shaped bike trays, such as those made by ThuleYakimaRocky Mounts, mount them to the Mundo’s outriggers, and start moving bikes!  Sounds easy, and as it turned out, it really was.  A few technical details needed to be worked out, as I will show you, but it didn’t take long to figure out.

Here are the things you’ll need:
(2) full length bike trays
(4) 1″ hex-head stainless steel machine screws with the same diameter and thread pitch as the ones that come mounted in the Mundo’s outriggers.  (The stock screws might not be long enough to go through the bike tray into the fitting).
A drill
A measuring tape (to measure exactly where to drill the holes in the trays).
Some old carpet or other material to protect the frames where they contact the Mundo in transit.
(2) Yuba 3 meter Cargo Straps (or similar).
(1) hour of time to do the first installation. (Note: once everything is measured and drilled, the process of removing or installing the racks takes less than 5 minutes).

Detail 3
Here’s what the final installation looked like.  The trays are different styles only because they were the only 2 available at the time.

The most expensive part of this project were the 4 stainless steel machine screws, as the used bike trays were donated by the Fort Collins Bike Co-op.  Getting a tray or 2 for a project like this could be a bit of a stumbling block, but if you keep your eyes open you can probably find one on craigslist, your local community bike shop, or even at a metal recycling center.

Although the original inspiration for the project was a short-term job, my long-term objective was to have a way to easily carry one or more bikes with the Mundo.  I have tried towing bikes, and it is not an ideal way to transport more than one bike, or even one bike over longer distances.  This setup with the trays allows me to, for instance, carry my mountain bike to the trailhead (about 10 miles) using the Mundo instead of a car.  It’s a great way to get to and from the trails without having to ride my mountain bike on the street for a fairly long distance.  The Mundo’s electric assist makes it super-easy to get up to the foothills quickly where I can then enjoy the amazing Colorado singletrack.

In Action 1
carrying the mountain bike to the mountains.

Here are some more detailed pictures of the installation process for the trays, and for those of you who might need to transport 3 bikes, I think there is a way of mounting a 3rd, short tray on the top of the cargo rack.  You’d have to have the kind where you remove the front wheel, otherwise the bike would stick out too far and you might have a problem with too much weight hanging off the back of the rack.

Detail 5
The outrigger with one screw removed in the front and rear to allow the rack to be installed.
Detail 9
Detail showing the extra-long machine screw needed due to the extra thickness of the rack.


Detail 7
Lining up the hole drilled in the rack with the outriggers’ screw hole.  Note the slot in my wood deck for the Go-Getter bags’ strap to go through.
Detail 10
Here is the tray on the other side showing the holes drilled to match up with the existing screw holes in the outrigger.
Detail 11
A view from the top, the rear screw is in, the front has not been attached yet.  Also note the piece of old carpet around the top rack to protect the bike being carried from rubbing against the steel of the Mundo.
Detail 15
As long as the tray is mounted at the correct angle you should have plenty of room to pedal.  The exact placement of the tray, and where to drill the holes was the most critical measurement during the installation.
Detail 19
Here’s the mountain bike mounted on the Mundo for transport to the trailhead.
Detail 23
Here’s a closeup of how to strap the upper part of the bike to the rack of the Mundo.
Detail 21
Another view of the strap holding the bike up.
Detail 22
Using the wheel straps that come with the bike tray to hold the wheels in place.
In Action 2
And hey, I’m off to the mountains!

Thanks for taking a look, and feel free to contact me if you have any questions about carrying bikes on your Mundo.  Once the system is in place it’s easy to put on or take off as needed, and as you might expect, it gets a lot of comments as you ride through town.  And if you want to see a short video of the bike carrying a bike, go to my vine page.  If you need to carry even more bikes, you could always build a custom trailer such as this one I recently saw at the Bike Library, built to carry 5 bikes!


Tahoe Daily Tribune: Bicycle pizza delivery pedals on

tahoeSouth Lake Tahoe is moving up the urban ladder. No, the city is not getting rail cars. But one business is bringing a new kind of delivery to town.

Justin Gresh of Vinny’s Pizzeria is putting the pedal to the pizza. The new business owner is delivering his fresh baked pies via bicycle.

“It’s a true replacement for your car or truck,” Gresh said outside his shop Wednesday. “For delivering pizzas it’s the perfect thing.”

Gresh has enjoyed riding bikes most of his life. Incorporating them into his business just seemed like the natural next step, he said.

After spending an afternoon in the heat of the kitchen, the bike provides a reprieve from the bustle.

“I like the idea of using the bike for business,” he said. “It’s fun for me to be able to get out of the place for a minute.”

Gresh specially built his ultimate delivery bike on the frame of a Yuba Cargo Bike. With a large pizza carrier on the back and the load capacity of more than 400 pounds, he can carry enough pizza for a decent-size party.

“This thing is great if you wanted to load up a couple kegs and throw a pizza on the back,” he laughed.

So far, he and his wife have delivered to Lakeside Beach and most often the Stateline casinos, not far from his location at Highway 50 and Pioneer. Bike delivery has been well received by his customers, Gresh said.

“Everybody has been super stoked,” he said.

With good weather and most flat surroundings, the business owner can cover a radius of about 1 mile without any problems. But before he lets his employees go riding all over town with hot pizza, he has to think about safety and training.

“From a business perspective, it’s a little more complex,” he said.

Nonetheless, he hopes to keep riding fresh food to hungry customers.

“In the summer, when the weather is nice, everybody is on a bike,” he said. “Doing deliveries isn’t something you really think about, but it’s so accessible.”

Though he does have studded tires, the bike delivery will probably have to go on hold when it gets cold.

“In the winter, it’ll have to go into hibernation,” he said.

Read more here….